The Sanchez hearsay rule, and the “compilation” exception. People v. Mooring, 9/27/17

The Sanchez hearsay rule, and the “compilation” exception. People v. Mooring, 9/27/17

The Sanchez hearsay rule, and the “compilation” exception. People v. Mooring, 9/27/17 This rule of hearsay in California continues to exercise its legs from our California Supreme Court decision People v. Sanchez. The final sha-bang with Sanchez is whether an expect can opine on a single, fact-specific hearsay (out of court statement) when testifying. And their holding was that single, fact-specific opinions like this are hearsay...

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Do your own work. People v. Hunter, 9/11/17

Do your own work. People v. Hunter, 9/11/17

In criminal law in California, Defendants can request discovery from the prosecution under California Penal Code 1054. However, what if there are co-defendants…and one D wants discovery from the co’D? Does 1054 require this disclosure? The quick answer: probably not. So you need to do your own work to investigate (legally speaking). This 9/11/17 decision People v. Hunter from the Court of Appeals of California, Fourth District,...

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Can police search my car after a DUI arrest? People v. Wallace

Can police search my car after a DUI arrest? People v. Wallace

I get this question a good deal, whether Police can search your car after a DUI arrest. This 9/7/17 case People v. Wallace gives some thoughts. It’s from the California Court of Appeal, 1st Appellate Dist., 2nd Div. There are laws as to whether police can search certain areas or containers in your car, and this case case doesn’t deal with that issue. Here, the officer sees the handle of a baton sticking out from a seat. At any rate,...

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More prosecutor misconduct in closing arguments: People v. Cowan

More prosecutor misconduct in closing arguments: People v. Cowan

Ah, Prosecutor misconduct: This February 23, 2017 decision People v. Cowan (8 Cal. App. 5th 1152; Court of Appeals of California, Second District, Division Six) deals with what Prosecutors can and cannot say in closing arguments.  It’s also a furtherance of the Cal Supreme decision People v. Centeno (2014) 60 Cal.4th 659 (Cowan was sent back to this Court to make its decision in accordance with Centeno). So first, in Centeno there were two main...

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Again: implied consent is NOT actual consent. People v. Mason

Again: implied consent is NOT actual consent. People v. Mason

Over the past years, we’ve seen drastic changes on whether a warrantless blood draw on a DUI arrest is lawful.  This issue has swept through both the US Supreme Courts (with McNeely (2013) 133 S.Ct. 1552 and Birchfield (2016) 136 S.Ct. 2160), as well as the California Courts. The most recent California case is People v. Arredondo (2016) 245 Cal.App.4th 186, which the Cal Supremes took up in June 2016.  We’re still waiting on their...

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